CONCERNED CITIZENS FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION


Concerned Citizens for Medical Education (CCME) is an advocacy group created to address the inherent fallacy at the root of the U.S. medical education and healthcare systems. CCME recognizes that graduate medical education in the United States is outdated and exclusive to a degree that borders corruption with little to no accountability. Students are evaluated using metrics that are societally and culturally biased in a transparent attempt to exploit the profession.

Standards and ethics are compromised to keep salaries high while opportunities are marginalized for those that can’t feed the pockets of gatekeepers. The system is failing and CCME demands reform.

Learn about U.S. medical schools and their lack of diversity, biased admissions policies, economic disparity, inaction, bloated tuition, and greed below.

UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITIES

U.S. MED SCHOOLS THINK DIVERSITY MEANS MAKING SURE 1 OUT OF EVERY 1,500* STUDENTS IS BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN.

WE DISAGREE.


In 1978, there were 542 black male matriculants to U.S. medical schools. In 2014 there were 515. Yet, somehow, through a severe case of cognitive dissonance, the AAMC thinks they’ve made huge strides in correcting their lack of diversity. That makes sense if you think “huge strides” means “made things significantly worse.”

If you agree, email your elected representative and tell them you think being black shouldn’t stop someone from wearing a white coat.

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ADMISSIONS POLICIES

IF THEY APPLIED TODAY, MOST U.S. MEDICAL SCHOOL DEANS WOULDN’T HAVE THE GRADES TO GET INTO THE SCHOOLS THEY RUN.

DID WE JUST MAKE IT WEIRD?


At the turn of the century, admissions requirements were pretty basic. Today, they include culturally biased MCAT scores, statistically irrelevant GPA metrics, a glut of recommendation letters, and a background check that would make a Secret Service Agent nervous.

We think these deans should be just as qualified as the students they admit. If you agree, pick a school and send their Dean an email politely asking him or her to retake the MCAT.

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ECONOMIC DISPARITY

RICH STUDENTS AND U.S. MED SCHOOLS ARE BASICALLY BFFS.

SERIOUSLY.


60% of U.S. medical schools come from the top 20% of income earners. Only 3% come from families in the bottom 10%. We don’t know about you, but we don’t think only trust fund babies should grow up to be physicians.

If you happen to be in that bottom 10%, find out how to improve your chances of getting into a U.S. medical school.

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PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE

U.S. MED SCHOOLS HAVEN’T DONE ANYTHING ABOUT THE PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE.

IGNORING PROBLEMS MAKES THEM GO AWAY, RIGHT?


Communities are suffering from a lack of primary care physicians. One would think U.S. med schools would urge their graduates to help solve with this crisis. One would be painfully wrong. Guess how many graduates of NYU School of Medicine went into primary care last year?

If you guessed 0, you’re right and an oddly competent guesser.

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HIGH TUITION

MOST DEANS OF MEDICINE MAKE MORE THAN THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

NO WONDER THEIR TUITION IS SO DARN HIGH.


It costs an average of $200,000 to go to a private U.S. med school. That’s not even half of what the average dean of medicine makes—some make more than $3 million a year. It doesn’t make them greedy, but it does make them hypocrites for suggesting that foreign or for-profit medical schools are the only ones turning a profit—despite having a significantly lower average tuition.

If you think that U.S. med school tuition is too darn high, consider asking those well-paid deans if they could spare 5 bucks for a disadvantaged student.

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DEANS’
RESPONSES:

YES NO

CLINICAL ROTATIONS

U.S. MED SCHOOLS WOULD RATHER HOSPITALS SHUT DOWN THAN PAY FOR CLINICAL ROTATIONS SLOTS.

WELL, WHO NEEDS HOSPITALS ANYWAY?


If you hear them tell it, U.S. med schools don’t believe in paying for clinical rotations, and think that no one else should either—even if the hospital needs those funds to, you know, continue being a hospital. Foreign medical schools have long helped those hospitals keep their doors open by offering to pay for any available rotation slots.

Since it’s beneath them to pay a hospital for a clinical rotation, click here to request a donation from a U.S. medical school on behalf of a hospital. Let’s hope charity isn’t beneath them, too.

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SCHOOLS’
RESPONSES:

YES NO

QUALITY INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL GRADUATES

FOREIGN AND U.S. MED SCHOOL GRADUATES PROVIDE THE SAME QUALITY OF CARE.

WHOOPS. WAS THAT SUPPOSED TO BE A SECRET?


Foreign medical school graduates have gone on to reach the highest echelons of the medical profession, except for Surgeon General. To be fair, we’ve only had, like, 50 of those. U.S. med schools constantly claim that they graduate more competent physicians, they have yet to provide any evidence and ignore all evidence to the contrary. Remind us, what’s it called when someone says something that clearly isn’t rooted in reality? Oh right, it’s called a lie.

Want to tell U.S. med schools and the AAMC to stop lying?

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